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Food News

Consumer Food Safety Practices: Raw Milk Consumption and Food Thermometer Use

USDA | Posted on February 6, 2019

 r\Researchers investigate the application of two Food and Drug Administration-recommended food-safety practices by taking a closer look at the estimated 14 percent of at-home meal preparers who use meat thermometers when preparing meat and the 2 percent who use nonpasteurized raw milk in a typical week.Each week, an estimated 2 percent of at-home meal preparers, or 3.2 million people (1.3 percent of the U.S. population age 18 or over) consumed or served raw milk. • Of at-home meal preparers that consumed or served raw milk, 80 percent or 2.6 million people lived with at least 1 other person; 44 percent or 1.4 million had a spouse; 36 percent or 1.1 million lived with at least 1 child; and 28 percent or 0.9 million lived in a household with at least 1 person age 62 or older. • Each week, an estimated 14 percent of at-home meal preparers, or 19.5 million people (7.9 percent of the U.S. population age 18 or over) used a food thermometer when preparing meals with meat, poultry, or seafood. • Of at-home meal preparers who used a food thermometer, 87 percent or 17 million lived with at least 1 other person; 65 percent or 12.6 million had a spouse; 39 percent or 7.5 million lived with at least 1 child; and 30 percent or 5.8 million lived in a household with at least 1 person age 62 or older


People Strongly Against GMOs Had Shakier Understanding Of Food Science

NPR | Posted on February 4, 2019

People who most intensely oppose genetically modified food think they know a lot about food science, but they actually know the least, according to a peer-reviewed paper published in January in the journal Nature Human Behaviour. GMOs are widely considered safe by scientists, but opponents have said they want more science on the potential harm so that subjective arguments aren't part of the equation. However, previous surveys have shown that providing more scientific facts about GMOs to people doesn't change their minds.The survey, conducted by four universities, asked 2,000 people in Europe and the United States how much they knew about genetically modified food, what their opinion was and how intense it was. The study asked a series of true-or-false questions about science, ranging from basic issues like whether the core of the Earth is hot or cold to questions on genetics, like "Does a non-genetically modified tomato have genes?" The results showed the more strongly people reported being opposed to GMOs, the lower their test score."A lot of people are upset by genetically modified food," said Sydney Scott, a marketing professor at Washington University in St. Louis, one of the schools that ran the study."We have to get people to recognize gaps in their knowledge before we try to teach them new things and have a meaningful discussion," she added.

 


We’ll Always Eat Meat. But More of It Will Be ‘Meat’

Bloomberg | Posted on January 29, 2019

More and more people are choosing to eat less and less meat. The trend is spawning a rapidly expanding industry for meat substitutes, both plant-based and a new high tech generation grown from animal cells in laboratories. From Bill Gates to Leonardo DiCaprio, investors are betting hundreds of millions of dollars that the appetite for meat alternatives will mushroom.Overall meat consumption continues to increase on a global scale, buoyed by rising affluence in developing economies such as China and Brazil. But while per capita consumption in the U.S., the world’s biggest beef consumer, is also growing, countries such as France, Germany, Spain and Sweden are cutting back on meat. What’s more, there’s a discernible shift in attitudes in wealthy nations, including the U.S. In a 2015 study, two-thirds of Americans said they had reduced their meat intake and a recent Gallup poll showed the number of U.S. vegans had risen by more than 3 million between 2012 and 2018 to about 3 percent of the population. 


Survey shows plant-based food label confusion

Voice of milk | Posted on January 29, 2019

 In a marketplace increasingly crowded by plant-based imitation dairy products, the results of a new survey show that customers are confused about whether those products are indeed dairy foods and whether they carry the same nutritional value.  The research evaluated three plant-based foods that mimic dairy cheese to understand if the packaging and descriptions are confusing. The survey, conducted by Ravel, was commissioned by Wisconsin Cheese Makers Association (WCMA), Dairy Farmers of Wisconsin and Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative, based in Wisconsin. The findings were included in comments that WMCA and Edge submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which is collecting public input as the agency considers changes to its enforcement of non-dairy labeling rules.


We'll always eat meat. But more of it won't be "meat"

Bloomberg | Posted on January 27, 2019

More and more people are choosing to eat less and less meat. Concerns over the environment, personal health and animal welfare are driving the change. The number of people committing to a strictly plant-based (vegan) diet is rising in many developed countries, as are the ranks of “flexitarians” — those who only occasionally consume meat. The trend is spawning a rapidly expanding industry for meat substitutes, both plant-based and a new high tech generation grown from animal cells in laboratories. From Bill Gates to Leonardo DiCaprio, investors are betting hundreds of millions of dollars that the appetite for meat alternatives will mushroom.Overall meat consumption continues to increase on a global scale, buoyed by rising affluence in developing economies such as China and Brazil. But while per capita consumption in the U.S., the world’s biggest beef consumer, is also growing, countries such as France, Germany, Spain and Sweden are cutting back on meat. What’s more, there’s a discernible shift in attitudes in wealthy nations, including the U.S. In a 2015 study, two-thirds of Americans said they had reduced their meat intake and a recent Gallup poll showed the number of U.S. vegans had risen by more than 3 million between 2012 and 2018 to about 3 percent of the population. While a third of U.K. consumers have lowered or stopped meat


EAT-Lancet Commission agenda ensures hunger, malnutrition

Feedstuffs | Posted on January 24, 2019

The EAT-Lancet Commission's alarmist, agenda-driven, speculative diet transformation appears to ensure sustainable hunger and malnutrition. "Food in the Anthropocene: the EAT–Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems." The paper calls for "transforming the global food system" to in part achieve the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Paris Agreement. The paper does raise ideas about and lofty thoughts on our global food production system that merit reasoned consideration as one seeks to responsibly feed all individuals in a nutritious and sustainable manner.  However, after reading the paper, one may conclude that the "great food transformation" would ensure sustained hunger and malnutrition.The paper appears to be written with an end-in-mind conclusion and thus the search for data points to justify the conclusion. 


New Canada food guide calls for plant-based diet, pushes salt and saturated fat to the side

The Hamilton Spectator | Posted on January 24, 2019

A group of doctors across the country has been crusading against some of the expected guidelines since 2016, saying Canadians should be eating fewer carbohydrates while continuing to eat fat from sources such as steak and cheese. The meat and potatoes of Canada's Food Guide used to be quite literally meat and potatoes. No more.The latest iteration of Health Canada's advice on what to eat has taken those two former dietary staples almost entirely off our plates and replaced them mainly with leafier vegetables, alternative proteins, such as tofu and beans, and whole grains, such as quinoa. Finally released Tuesday after a long delay, the 2019 guide advises Canadians to limit sugar, salt and saturated fat and, in a departure from previous guides, embrace a plant-based diet. A dinner plate that is half-full of brightly coloured veggies and fruit has replaced the rainbow and pyramid as the guide's new image. Small cubes of beef and thin slices of poultry are almost hidden on the plate beside chickpeas and walnuts.

 

 

 


Organic price premiums dip as demand grows, choices multiply

Honolulu Star Advisor | Posted on January 24, 2019

U.S. shoppers are still paying more for organic food, but the price premium is falling as organic options multiply. Last year, organic food and beverages cost an average of 24 cents more per unit than conventional food, or about 7.5 percent more, according to Nielsen. That was down from a 27 cent, or 9 percent, premium in 2014.


Nebraska meat label bill gets legislative switch-up

Meating Place (free registration required) | Posted on January 24, 2019

Sen. Carol Blood withdrew her original proposal, Legislative Bill 14, earlier this week and introduced LB 594, which would add a clause to the state’s existing Uniform Deceptive Trade Practices Act. The clause would place in violation of the act anyone who "advertises, promotes, labels, represents, illustrates, displays, for sale, offers for sale, attempts to sell, or sells an insect-based, a plant-based, or a lab-grown food product as meat."


California:Healthy Kid’s Meal Drinks Is Now State Law

Get Healthy | Posted on January 23, 2019

Governor Brown signed SB 1192, which is the California Healthy-by-Default Kids’ Meal Drinks bill! The bill requires restaurants in the state that market children’s meals to offer only water or milk as the default beverage for the children’s meals. This is a big step towards reducing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption by children and creating a healthier food environment. 


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